review on casino royale

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Both intimate and inviting, every seat at Sound Board offers incredible sightlines of all the action on the stage. The theater space features state-of-the-art acoustics and up-to-the-minute technology from top to bottom. Simply put: it's awesome live and free music. Every day.

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Review on casino royale

The new , however, is darker than previous incarnations. His sly, barely perceptible smile suggests that he relishes revenge and takes pleasure in his violence. The film is full of violence, including spectacular explosions, intense physical fights, shooting, knifing, cars crashing, and drowning. Dead bodies show blood and vacant-eyed faces. A torture scene featuring a naked Bond shows him in obvious pain as his genitals are smashed with a large, knotted rope.

One main character meets a sad demise. Sex scenes show Bond with two different women, in various states of undress. Lots of martini-drinking as Bond discovers his drink of choice thanks to liquor sponsors Heineken and Smirnoff. The language is pretty mild. Add your rating See all 38 parent reviews. Add your rating See all kid reviews. Bond's early adventures involve all manner of brutality and rule-breaking, as he fixes on his targets with unshakable ferocity.

First he chases one man through the "Nambutu Embassy" in Madagascar, wreaking havoc and, as M puts it, violating "the only inviolate rule of international relations. And then he destroys much of the Miami Airport in order to stop a bomb's explosion. All of this is warm-up for the big showdown with the requisite dastardly, damaged villain Le Chiffre Mads Mikkelsen , which centers around a high-stakes poker game.

This Bond is cunning and even elegant, providing the franchise with a much-needed shot of raw energy. But although the details are right, Casino Royale is bogged down by the plot, which spends too much time on the poker game and a montage sequence version of Bond and Vesper's inevitable romance. Such generic diversions detract from Craig's strengths, which are based in deft gestures, nuanced glances, and the deadpan delivery of the occasional joke.

Asked whether he wants his martini shaken or stirred, Bond looks annoyed: "Do I look like I give a damn? By the time of the next installment, perhaps the script will keep up with him. Families can talk about what makes Bond so appealing. What does his behavior in Casino Royale say about images of manliness? How does the movie characterize this new Bond as both ruthless and charismatic?

Who's your favorite Bond? Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners. See how we rate. Streaming options powered by JustWatch. Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support. Our ratings are based on child development best practices.

We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality. Learn how we rate. Parents' Ultimate Guide to Support our work! Casino Royale Popular with kids Parents recommend. Darker than usual Bond; too violent for tweens. PG minutes. Rate movie. Watch or buy. Based on 38 reviews. Based on reviews. Get it now Searching for streaming and purchasing options Common Sense is a nonprofit organization.

Your purchase helps us remain independent and ad-free. Get it now on Searching for streaming and purchasing options X of Y Official trailer. We're committed to diversity in media. Suggest an update Casino Royale Your privacy is important to us. We won't share this comment without your permission.

Five directors helmed this production, and it shows. Casino Royale is poorly-paced and the transitions are largely ineffectual. Each segment has a different main character, so the overall effect is like cobbling together five short episodes, then devising a ludicrous ending to resolve them all. It doesn't work, and the viewer is left scratching his or her head, wondering what's going on.

Three "legitimate" Bond actors crossed between the official series and Casino Royale. By far the best element of Casino Royale is Burt Bacharach's score. Light and upbeat, it's the perfect musical companion for a spy spoof. Neither John Barry nor the "James Bond Theme" is missed although a Barry tune can be briefly heard -- Bacharach uses the title track from Born Free during a scene with some lions. Despite an impressive cast that includes such notables as Niven, Sellers, Allen, Orson Welles, Jean-Paul Belmondo, and Jacqueline Bisset, Casino Royale is too ridiculous and muddled to be of more than passing interest to real Bond enthusiasts.

The few good aspects of this farce are vastly outweighed by the bad. Besides, given how close some of the Bond movies have come to self-parody, it's questionable whether an outright satire is warranted. Distributor: Columbia Pictures. Run Time: U. Comments Add Comment.

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Brosnan did not demolish the memory of his Bond years with that pot, but he came admirably close. Every generation gets the Bond it deserves if not necessarily desires, and with his creased face and uneasy smile, Mr. Craig fits these grim times well.

The inky blood soon gives way to full-blown color, but not until Bond has killed one man with his hands after a violent struggle and fatally shot a second. A year later it was made into a television drama with the American actor Barry Nelson as Jimmy Bond; the following decade, it was a ham-fisted spoof with David Niven as the spy and a very funny Peter Sellers as a card shark. Kennedy took the Cuban missile crisis public. In time Mr. Brosnan portrayed the spy as something of a gentleman playboy.

That probably helps explain why some Bond fanatics have objected so violently to Mr. Like a lot of action films, the Bond franchise has always used comedy to blunt the violence and bring in big audiences. You see Mr. Craig sweating and very nice sweat it is too ; you sense the filmmakers doing the same.

The characteristically tangled shenanigans — as if it mattered — involve a villainous free agent named Le Chiffre the excellent Danish actor Mads Mikkelsen , who wheels and deals using money temporarily borrowed from his equally venal clients.

I've been a fan of Craig since the little known Layer Cake and I am happy to say he does an outstanding job as Bond. Micheal Compton. Top Box Office. More Top Movies Trailers. Certified Fresh Picks. Black Mirror: Season 5. Into The Dark: Season 2. Lovecraft Country: Season 1. The Mandalorian: Season 1. Saturday Night Live: Season Orphan Black: Season 5. The Walking Dead: Season WandaVision: Season 1. Watchmen: Season 1. Certified Fresh Pick. View All. Black History Month.

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How did you buy your ticket? View All Videos 1. View All Photos Movie Info. Learning that Le Chiffre plans to raise money in a high-stakes poker game, MI6 sends Bond to play against him, gambling that their newest "00" operative will topple the man's organization. Martin Campbell. Barbara Broccoli , Michael G. Nov 30, Eon Productions Ltd.

James Bond Daniel Craig James Bond. Eva Green Vesper Lynd. Mads Mikkelsen Le Chiffre. Judi Dench M. Caterina Murino Solange. Simon Abkarian Dimitrios. Jeffrey Wright Felix Leiter. Giancarlo Giannini Mathis. Ivana Milicevic Valenka. Martin Campbell Director. Neal Purvis Writer. Robert Wade Writer. Anthony Waye Writer. Ian Fleming Writer Characters. Barbara Broccoli Producer.

Michael G. Wilson Producer. David Arnold Original Music. Christian Wagner Film Editor. Debbie McWilliams Casting. New on Amazon Prime Video in September November 2, Full Review…. February 14, Full Review…. July 16, Rating: 4. November 20, Rating: B Full Review…. September 10, Full Review…. View All Critic Reviews May 01, Rebooting a film franchise can often come across as an act of desperation: an admission that the characters or story have been taken as far as they can possibly go, and a cynical means of luring in a new generation on the pretence of giving them ownership over 'their version' of a property.

Perversely, the more successful a given reboot is, the easier it seemingly becomes to pull this same trick again the second that a particular instalment mildly underperforms. It may seem hard to believe in an age of cinematic universes where knowledge of superhero continuity is a badge of honour - but then we remember that Spider-Man and Superman have both been rebooted twice in the space of a decade.

Die Another Day marked the Bond series' 40th anniversary in the most deeply disappointing way possible, serving up a glorified greatest hits compilation which played out like reheated leftovers. Faced with its deserved critical kicking and Pierce Brosnan's subsequent departure, the guardians of the series must have felt that starting from scratch and going back was the only way forward.

Casino Royale is a worthy exception to the rule that reboots are pointless and underwhelming, delivering just the sort of reinvention that the franchise needed. It may even be the best film in the entire series. Part of the secret behind the Bond series' longevity is that it has always adjusted its character and storylines to the culture and politics of a given period.

Sometimes it has done this so nakedly that the films in question date badly, whether it's Live and Let Die's attempts at aping Shaft, The Man with the Golden Gun cashing in on Enter the Dragon, or Moonraker trying and failing to be the next Star Wars.

Often Bond has been at his best when he acknowledges his mortality and the world changing around him, while retaining the character elements which made him so popular in the first place. Goldeneye made a big deal about the Cold War ending, but it still felt like a story in which Bond had a rightful place. The spectre hanging over Casino Royale, and indeed all of the Daniel Craig era, is the Bourne series.

The first three films shifted the goalposts of what constituted a modern action-thriller, innovating with its gripping storylines, sharp camerawork and relatable yet remarkable protagonist. Even Brosnan admitted that the series would have had to raise its game in the face of what The Bourne Identity did; watching that and Die Another Day now, it's hard to believe that they came from the same decade, let alone the same year.

Casino Royale manages to match The Bourne Supremacy for quality, borrowing some of its aesthetic touches particularly in the chase sequences while also capturing the intrigue of Ian Fleming's original novel. Like Paul Greengrass, Martin Campbell understands the need to knit action and character scenes together to create a holistic, gripping package; the action feels like an integral and natural part of the drama, rather than interrupting it in order to show off the budget.

Campbell brings the same calm, steady and methodical touch that he brought to Goldeneye; having saved Bond from irrelevance once, he does it again in some style. Skyfall so often gets praised for acknowledging Bond's past while still being modern and relevant, but Casino Royale manages to pull off this same trick, and arguably does it slightly better. Where Skyfall consciously tips its hat to the older films through costumes, characters or props such as the iconic Aston Martin DB5 , Casino Royale is more subtle; all the classic elements are there, but they've been modernised and refined so that they make more sense in the real world.

It's still fitting for Bond to drive an Aston Martin, and it's a nice touch to see its distant predecessor roll by. But it wouldn't make sense for Bond's car to have many gadgets that he doesn't need, and having the car be wrecked to save Vesper makes complete sense. Where Roger Moore or Brosnan's films glorified the gadgets, this restores some welcome credibility and keeps the hardware under wraps unless absolutely necessary. Along these same lines, the screenplay takes all the best elements of Fleming's novel and transposes them into a contemporary setting.

It still has all the glamour of the classic casino scenes from the Sean Connery era, but the playful banter and flirting has been replaced with high stakes, tense glances and much more serious consequences.

Le Chiffre's relationships with arms dealers and dodgy speculation on the stock market felt current for its day and still feels very fresh; great effort is expended to ground the character's motivations while maintaining an air of intrigue, mystery and threat. The film takes itself seriously, but not too seriously; it wants to have fun, but it puts credibility above out-and-out entertainment, unlike many of Moore's entries in the canon.

Le Chiffre's characterisation is also an interesting departure from what the Bond villain archetype has become. Where the likes of Drax, Stromberg and Blofeld wanted to single-handedly destroy or take over the world, Le Chiffre is essentially a middle-man; he is to the Craig era what Kristatos was in For Your Eyes Only, but better written and with a more interesting, more murky motivation.

Like Bond, he is ultimately a pawn of bigger forces who struggles at times not to buckle under the pressure as the torture scene demonstrates ; by making him so small, he becomes more believable and more intimidating, even without the bleeding eye. He may look like the lead singer of Franz Ferdinand in his haircut and dress sense, but Mads Mikkelson plays him brilliantly, bringing a cold, dead-eyed feel to the character which both intrigues and repulses an audience.

Creating convincing poker scenes in films is pretty difficult. The vast majority of efforts go for a highly stylised or choreographed approach, where audience expectations are pandered to through needless editing trickery; think of the final hand in The Cincinnati Kid, or the royal flush sequence in Maverick.

Casino Royale's poker scenes may be more stylised than those in, say, The Sting or Rounders, but they are still very well-executed with good pacing and a frisson of unpredictability. What really makes them work, however, is the build-up in the script; there are little poker motifs dotted throughout, with comments about tells and misdirection. Because the film makes such a big theme out of bluffing and people not being what they seem, the card games don't feel like isolated set-pieces, and the later developments with Mathis and Vesper feel credible and yet still surprising.

It isn't just that both characters ultimately don't make it past the final reel; the characters are both instrumental in the making of Bond, an affront and a challenge to his impulsive, playboy instincts and a safe refuge from the madness of his job and the people he has to kill.

Eva Green is every bit as gripping and electric on screen as Diana Rigg before her; Vesper goes toe-to-toe with Bond and we get genuine character development, making her betrayal and death all the more shocking and heartbreaking. Craig's Bond is a changed man by the end of the film - it's just a pity that the resolution to his heartbreak in Quantum of Solace was as underwhelming and mishandled as the similar attempt in Diamonds Are Forever.

The heartbreak surrounding Vesper brings us onto another of Casino Royale's great successes: it hurts. Desmond Llewellyn's Q may have advised Bond that he should never let his enemies see him bleed, but the best Bond films have never been afraid of putting him through the mill, getting him into dangerous situations which can only be resolved at great cost - a cost often numbed by women and alcohol.

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His spurs earned, Bond must now tackle his first super-villain: Le Chiffre, banker to Smersh in the original, now accountant and financier to international terrorists everywhere, though al-Qaida and anyone else from the Middle East are coyly left unmentioned. Le Chiffre is played by Mads Mikkelsen, in which role he has the privilege of following Orson Welles from the spoof version. The Treasury official accompanying Bond to the casino and fronting up zillions of pounds of taxpayer's cash is the slinky Miss Vesper Lynd, played by Eva Green, who speaks English in a residual French accent that makes her sound permanently sarky.

Despite the big hair, she is no run-of-the-mill Bond girl; with her Olympic-standard embonpoint and inverted triangle face, she has a sexy head-girl haughtiness, and the many close-ups of her tensely appalled expression by the card table make it look as if she has witnessed Bond dissecting a frog on the green baize. This is not exactly back-to-basics Bond. The franchise is still apparently stuck with branding and concealed advertising, as well as the naff euro-trash hotels, with receptionists who get their plug in - "Welcome to the Hotel Splendide!

There is even a subliminal glimpse of that chief blagger of product placements, Sir Richard Branson. M is Dame Judi Dench , splendidly icy and disapproving, yet caring. And though Bond wins a vintage Aston Martin without ejector seat in a card game, it's not a very gadgety movie, excepting all those mobiles and laptops with their impossibly lightning-fast graphics and streaming video. As far as Bond's erotic life goes, the movie retains one important element from Fleming's novel: Bond gets tortured - in the nude!

It's a gamey scene that has caused generations of Bond readers to nurse and then uneasily suppress certain wonderings about the nature of 's fanbase. These wonderings will not, I have to say, be quashed by Daniel Craig's pert swimming costume.

But Craig strikes some very erotic sparks from Vesper Lynd, with some loaded bantering over dinner in a first-class railway compartment, and finally, from him, a dead-straight passionate declaration of love. Sweetly, Bond doesn't have sex with anyone else in the film. Vesper is to break his heart, though, and the movie cleverly shows that all Bond's mannerisms and steely reserve grow from this prehistory of doomed romance.

It is all ridiculously enjoyable, because the smirking and the quips and the gadgets have been cut back - and the emotion and wholesome sado-masochism have been pumped up. My only regret is that the classic Barry theme tune is saved for the closing credits.

Mr Craig brings off cinema's most preposterous role with insouciant grit: I hope he doesn't quit too soon. I never thought I would see a Bond movie where I cared, actually cared, about the people. Vesper Lynd, however, is definitely stirring, as she was in Bertolucci's wonderful " The Dreamers. Vesper and James have a shower scene that answers, at last, why nobody in a Bond movie ever seems to have any real emotions. A review should not be a list.

So I should not enumerate all the scenes I liked. But I learn from IMDb that the special credit for the "free running" scenes of Sabastian Foucan refers to the sensational opening Madagascar foot chase in which Foucan practices parkour, or the ability to run at walls and angles and bounce off them to climb or change direction; Jackie Chan could do similar feats. Which brings up another thing. Most of the chases and stunts in "Casino Royale" take place in something vaguely approximating real space and time.

Of course I know they use doubles and deceptive camera angles and edits to cover impossibilities, but the point is: They try to make it look real. Recently, with the advent of portable cameras and computerized editing, action movies have substituted visual chaos for visual elegance. I think the public is getting tired of action sequences that are created in post-production. I've been swamped with letters complaining about " The Bourne Ultimatum. The plot centers on a marathon high-stakes poker game, in which Bond will try to deprive Le Chiffre Mads Mikkelsen of 10 million or more pounds that would go to finance terrorism.

Le Chiffre "The Cypher" has problems on his own, because he owes money big-time to the people who supply it to him. Director Martin Campbell builds suspense in the extended poker game by not being afraid to focus for long seconds on the eyes of the two main opponents, which is all the more effective because Le Chiffre's left eye has tears of blood, inspiring a classic Bond line.

Bond's absences from the table are of more than ordinary interest. This is Campbell's second Bond picture, after " Goldeneye " , but he breaks with his own and everyone else's tradition. He's helped by Craig, who gives the sense of a hard man, wounded by life and his job, who nevertheless cares about people and right and wrong. To a certain degree, the earlier Bonds were lustful technicians. With this one, since he has a big scene involving a merchant's house in Venice, we can excuse ourselves for observing that if you prick him, he bleeds.

Roger Ebert was the film critic of the Chicago Sun-Times from until his death in In , he won the Pulitzer Prize for distinguished criticism. Rated PG for intense sequences of violent action, a scene of torture, sexual content and nudity.

Daniel Craig as James Bond. Eva Green as Vesper Lynd. Judi Dench as M. Jeffrey Wright as Felix Leiter. Giancarlo Giannini as Mathis. Mads Mikkelsen as Le Chiffre. Reviews Gold Bond.

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How did you buy your ticket? View All Videos 1. View All Photos Movie Info. Learning that Le Chiffre plans to raise money in a high-stakes poker game, MI6 sends Bond to play against him, gambling that their newest "00" operative will topple the man's organization. Martin Campbell. Barbara Broccoli , Michael G. Nov 30, Eon Productions Ltd. James Bond Daniel Craig James Bond. Eva Green Vesper Lynd. Mads Mikkelsen Le Chiffre.

Judi Dench M. Caterina Murino Solange. Simon Abkarian Dimitrios. Jeffrey Wright Felix Leiter. Giancarlo Giannini Mathis. Ivana Milicevic Valenka. Martin Campbell Director. Neal Purvis Writer. Robert Wade Writer. Anthony Waye Writer.

Ian Fleming Writer Characters. Barbara Broccoli Producer. Michael G. Wilson Producer. David Arnold Original Music. Christian Wagner Film Editor. Debbie McWilliams Casting. New on Amazon Prime Video in September November 2, Full Review…. February 14, Full Review…. July 16, Rating: 4. November 20, Rating: B Full Review…. September 10, Full Review…. View All Critic Reviews May 01, Rebooting a film franchise can often come across as an act of desperation: an admission that the characters or story have been taken as far as they can possibly go, and a cynical means of luring in a new generation on the pretence of giving them ownership over 'their version' of a property.

Perversely, the more successful a given reboot is, the easier it seemingly becomes to pull this same trick again the second that a particular instalment mildly underperforms. It may seem hard to believe in an age of cinematic universes where knowledge of superhero continuity is a badge of honour - but then we remember that Spider-Man and Superman have both been rebooted twice in the space of a decade.

Die Another Day marked the Bond series' 40th anniversary in the most deeply disappointing way possible, serving up a glorified greatest hits compilation which played out like reheated leftovers. Faced with its deserved critical kicking and Pierce Brosnan's subsequent departure, the guardians of the series must have felt that starting from scratch and going back was the only way forward.

Casino Royale is a worthy exception to the rule that reboots are pointless and underwhelming, delivering just the sort of reinvention that the franchise needed. It may even be the best film in the entire series.

Part of the secret behind the Bond series' longevity is that it has always adjusted its character and storylines to the culture and politics of a given period. Sometimes it has done this so nakedly that the films in question date badly, whether it's Live and Let Die's attempts at aping Shaft, The Man with the Golden Gun cashing in on Enter the Dragon, or Moonraker trying and failing to be the next Star Wars.

Often Bond has been at his best when he acknowledges his mortality and the world changing around him, while retaining the character elements which made him so popular in the first place. Goldeneye made a big deal about the Cold War ending, but it still felt like a story in which Bond had a rightful place. The spectre hanging over Casino Royale, and indeed all of the Daniel Craig era, is the Bourne series. The first three films shifted the goalposts of what constituted a modern action-thriller, innovating with its gripping storylines, sharp camerawork and relatable yet remarkable protagonist.

Even Brosnan admitted that the series would have had to raise its game in the face of what The Bourne Identity did; watching that and Die Another Day now, it's hard to believe that they came from the same decade, let alone the same year. Casino Royale manages to match The Bourne Supremacy for quality, borrowing some of its aesthetic touches particularly in the chase sequences while also capturing the intrigue of Ian Fleming's original novel.

Like Paul Greengrass, Martin Campbell understands the need to knit action and character scenes together to create a holistic, gripping package; the action feels like an integral and natural part of the drama, rather than interrupting it in order to show off the budget. Campbell brings the same calm, steady and methodical touch that he brought to Goldeneye; having saved Bond from irrelevance once, he does it again in some style.

Skyfall so often gets praised for acknowledging Bond's past while still being modern and relevant, but Casino Royale manages to pull off this same trick, and arguably does it slightly better. Where Skyfall consciously tips its hat to the older films through costumes, characters or props such as the iconic Aston Martin DB5 , Casino Royale is more subtle; all the classic elements are there, but they've been modernised and refined so that they make more sense in the real world.

It's still fitting for Bond to drive an Aston Martin, and it's a nice touch to see its distant predecessor roll by. But it wouldn't make sense for Bond's car to have many gadgets that he doesn't need, and having the car be wrecked to save Vesper makes complete sense. Where Roger Moore or Brosnan's films glorified the gadgets, this restores some welcome credibility and keeps the hardware under wraps unless absolutely necessary.

Along these same lines, the screenplay takes all the best elements of Fleming's novel and transposes them into a contemporary setting. It still has all the glamour of the classic casino scenes from the Sean Connery era, but the playful banter and flirting has been replaced with high stakes, tense glances and much more serious consequences. Le Chiffre's relationships with arms dealers and dodgy speculation on the stock market felt current for its day and still feels very fresh; great effort is expended to ground the character's motivations while maintaining an air of intrigue, mystery and threat.

The film takes itself seriously, but not too seriously; it wants to have fun, but it puts credibility above out-and-out entertainment, unlike many of Moore's entries in the canon. Le Chiffre's characterisation is also an interesting departure from what the Bond villain archetype has become. Where the likes of Drax, Stromberg and Blofeld wanted to single-handedly destroy or take over the world, Le Chiffre is essentially a middle-man; he is to the Craig era what Kristatos was in For Your Eyes Only, but better written and with a more interesting, more murky motivation.

Like Bond, he is ultimately a pawn of bigger forces who struggles at times not to buckle under the pressure as the torture scene demonstrates ; by making him so small, he becomes more believable and more intimidating, even without the bleeding eye. He may look like the lead singer of Franz Ferdinand in his haircut and dress sense, but Mads Mikkelson plays him brilliantly, bringing a cold, dead-eyed feel to the character which both intrigues and repulses an audience.

Creating convincing poker scenes in films is pretty difficult. The vast majority of efforts go for a highly stylised or choreographed approach, where audience expectations are pandered to through needless editing trickery; think of the final hand in The Cincinnati Kid, or the royal flush sequence in Maverick.

Casino Royale's poker scenes may be more stylised than those in, say, The Sting or Rounders, but they are still very well-executed with good pacing and a frisson of unpredictability. What really makes them work, however, is the build-up in the script; there are little poker motifs dotted throughout, with comments about tells and misdirection. Because the film makes such a big theme out of bluffing and people not being what they seem, the card games don't feel like isolated set-pieces, and the later developments with Mathis and Vesper feel credible and yet still surprising.

It isn't just that both characters ultimately don't make it past the final reel; the characters are both instrumental in the making of Bond, an affront and a challenge to his impulsive, playboy instincts and a safe refuge from the madness of his job and the people he has to kill. Eva Green is every bit as gripping and electric on screen as Diana Rigg before her; Vesper goes toe-to-toe with Bond and we get genuine character development, making her betrayal and death all the more shocking and heartbreaking.

Craig's Bond is a changed man by the end of the film - it's just a pity that the resolution to his heartbreak in Quantum of Solace was as underwhelming and mishandled as the similar attempt in Diamonds Are Forever. The heartbreak surrounding Vesper brings us onto another of Casino Royale's great successes: it hurts.

Desmond Llewellyn's Q may have advised Bond that he should never let his enemies see him bleed, but the best Bond films have never been afraid of putting him through the mill, getting him into dangerous situations which can only be resolved at great cost - a cost often numbed by women and alcohol. The fight scenes in Casino Royale feel brutal, just as they should do; it isn't interesting to have someone waltz through conflict as though it was nothing.

The torture scene and the defibrillator scene are great in isolation, but they are matched by Bond's emotional torment of losing Vesper. For the first time since Timothy Dalton's era - or Goldeneye at a push - Bond's pain feels real and meaningful. All of which brings us to Daniel Craig as Bond. While his subsequent films have been hit-and-miss, his performance here is more than enough to silence those who criticised his casting all those 'James Blonde' jokes sound all the more desperate now.

He takes the suffering and burnt-out approach that Dalton brought and fuses it with some of Connery's unabashed cool to create a truly modern and contemporary Bond. He also has the confidence to eschew convention as much as he chooses to reflect or inhabit it; we get a build-up to a cliched sex scene, but then he's quickly on his toes and back to the plot.

Casino Royale is a great, gripping spy thriller and arguably the finest of all the James Bond films. While it is slightly too long and a little too candid with some of its product placement, it remains an extraordinary reinvention of a franchise which had long been in need of a boost. Craig impresses in his first and finest performance as Bond, and Martin Campbell directs with great common sense and precision to create a majestic and immensely enjoyable film.

Whether looking at the newer films or the franchise as a whole, this has set a very high bar which has yet to be beaten. Daniel M Super Reviewer. It may not display this or other websites correctly. You should upgrade or use an alternative browser. Casino Royale 4K Blu-ray Review. Bond Begins by Casimir Harlow Nov 5, Review Specs Discussion Casino Royale Film Review Arguably the definitive Bond, Daniel Craig's stunning debut remains a high point in both the franchise and his own series.

When Daniel Craig's Bond bulldozed his way onto our screens back in , he almost immediately established himself as the definitive interpretation of Ian Fleming's cold, brutal, near-alcoholic spy, taking us through an electric - and somewhat epic - first adventure which grounded the half-century-old character in a post-Bourne landscape.

However, viewed through the Spectre of the last instalment, it's easy to see why the long-running franchise has been comprehensively bested by the likes of Tom Cruise's Mission: Impossible series. Thankfully - not withstanding some truly awful plot retro-fitting courtesy of that last chapter - Casino Royale can still be looked back upon as a near-perfect chapter in the franchise, a veritable all time high which Craig himself is still riding on, even 13 years and three soon to be four flawed sequels later.

Casino Royale perfectly established Craig as a modern generation Bond. It is an upgrade, even if it's not quite the upgrade that fans would have hoped for. Casino Royale's 4K release doesn't exactly surprise on the extras front. Casino Royale can still be looked back upon as near-perfect, even three flawed sequels later. The results are of varying quality, with Casino Royale itself displaying a nominal improvement on its Dolby Vision-enhanced 4K bow, but the lack of immersive Atmos or DTS:X audio likely leaving this hardly a selling point chapter in the set.

Nonetheless, it's easily the best of the films, and arguably one of the best Bond movies ever made, so perhaps picking it up is a no-brainer. Our Review Ethos Read about our review ethos and the meaning of our review badges.

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Learn how we rate. Parents' Ultimate Guide to Support our work! Casino Royale Popular with kids Parents recommend. Darker than usual Bond; too violent for tweens. PG minutes. Rate movie. Watch or buy. Based on 38 reviews. Based on reviews. Get it now Searching for streaming and purchasing options Common Sense is a nonprofit organization. Your purchase helps us remain independent and ad-free.

Get it now on Searching for streaming and purchasing options X of Y Official trailer. We're committed to diversity in media. Suggest an update Casino Royale Your privacy is important to us. We won't share this comment without your permission. If you chose to provide an email address, it will only be used to contact you about your comment. See our privacy policy. A lot or a little? The parents' guide to what's in this movie. Positive Messages. What parents need to know Parents need to know that Casino Royale is the much-hyped re-start to the James Bond franchise.

Continue reading Show less. Stay up to date on new reviews. Get full reviews, ratings, and advice delivered weekly to your inbox. User Reviews Parents say Kids say. Parent of a year-old Written by littleone February 17, Best to wait till they're 13 to watch this one Although the Bond movies aren't my thing, I proof-watched it to see if my son could watch it. One of the concerns that I had with this movie was the langua Continue reading.

Report this review. Adult Written by flunky January 2, Teen, 13 years old Written by I have no username November 19, This film is about James Bond who has recently been promoted to status has been Teen, 14 years old Written by ethanct86 October 12, One of my favorites, though dark. The best Bond film ever made. I know. This is a James Bond movie; many people around here are not allowed to see them, but surprisingly, Martin Campbell does one heck of a rare thrilling job What's the story?

Is it any good? Talk to your kids about Last updated : February 20, Our editors recommend. Silly spoof tamer than Austin Powers. Thrilling action comedy may be the best Bond. For kids who love action. Spy Movies for Kids. Let's get your review verified. Fandango AMCTheatres. More Info. Submit By opting to have your ticket verified for this movie, you are allowing us to check the email address associated with your Rotten Tomatoes account against an email address associated with a Fandango ticket purchase for the same movie.

How did you buy your ticket? View All Videos 1. View All Photos Movie Info. Learning that Le Chiffre plans to raise money in a high-stakes poker game, MI6 sends Bond to play against him, gambling that their newest "00" operative will topple the man's organization. Martin Campbell. Barbara Broccoli , Michael G. Nov 30, Eon Productions Ltd. James Bond Daniel Craig James Bond.

Eva Green Vesper Lynd. Mads Mikkelsen Le Chiffre. Judi Dench M. Caterina Murino Solange. Simon Abkarian Dimitrios. Jeffrey Wright Felix Leiter. Giancarlo Giannini Mathis. Ivana Milicevic Valenka. Martin Campbell Director. Neal Purvis Writer. Robert Wade Writer. Anthony Waye Writer. Ian Fleming Writer Characters. Barbara Broccoli Producer. Michael G. Wilson Producer. David Arnold Original Music. Christian Wagner Film Editor. Debbie McWilliams Casting.

New on Amazon Prime Video in September November 2, Full Review…. February 14, Full Review…. July 16, Rating: 4. November 20, Rating: B Full Review…. September 10, Full Review…. View All Critic Reviews May 01, Rebooting a film franchise can often come across as an act of desperation: an admission that the characters or story have been taken as far as they can possibly go, and a cynical means of luring in a new generation on the pretence of giving them ownership over 'their version' of a property.

Perversely, the more successful a given reboot is, the easier it seemingly becomes to pull this same trick again the second that a particular instalment mildly underperforms. It may seem hard to believe in an age of cinematic universes where knowledge of superhero continuity is a badge of honour - but then we remember that Spider-Man and Superman have both been rebooted twice in the space of a decade.

Die Another Day marked the Bond series' 40th anniversary in the most deeply disappointing way possible, serving up a glorified greatest hits compilation which played out like reheated leftovers. Faced with its deserved critical kicking and Pierce Brosnan's subsequent departure, the guardians of the series must have felt that starting from scratch and going back was the only way forward. Casino Royale is a worthy exception to the rule that reboots are pointless and underwhelming, delivering just the sort of reinvention that the franchise needed.

It may even be the best film in the entire series. Part of the secret behind the Bond series' longevity is that it has always adjusted its character and storylines to the culture and politics of a given period. Sometimes it has done this so nakedly that the films in question date badly, whether it's Live and Let Die's attempts at aping Shaft, The Man with the Golden Gun cashing in on Enter the Dragon, or Moonraker trying and failing to be the next Star Wars.

Often Bond has been at his best when he acknowledges his mortality and the world changing around him, while retaining the character elements which made him so popular in the first place. Goldeneye made a big deal about the Cold War ending, but it still felt like a story in which Bond had a rightful place.

The spectre hanging over Casino Royale, and indeed all of the Daniel Craig era, is the Bourne series. The first three films shifted the goalposts of what constituted a modern action-thriller, innovating with its gripping storylines, sharp camerawork and relatable yet remarkable protagonist. Even Brosnan admitted that the series would have had to raise its game in the face of what The Bourne Identity did; watching that and Die Another Day now, it's hard to believe that they came from the same decade, let alone the same year.

Casino Royale manages to match The Bourne Supremacy for quality, borrowing some of its aesthetic touches particularly in the chase sequences while also capturing the intrigue of Ian Fleming's original novel. Like Paul Greengrass, Martin Campbell understands the need to knit action and character scenes together to create a holistic, gripping package; the action feels like an integral and natural part of the drama, rather than interrupting it in order to show off the budget.

Campbell brings the same calm, steady and methodical touch that he brought to Goldeneye; having saved Bond from irrelevance once, he does it again in some style. Skyfall so often gets praised for acknowledging Bond's past while still being modern and relevant, but Casino Royale manages to pull off this same trick, and arguably does it slightly better.

Where Skyfall consciously tips its hat to the older films through costumes, characters or props such as the iconic Aston Martin DB5 , Casino Royale is more subtle; all the classic elements are there, but they've been modernised and refined so that they make more sense in the real world. It's still fitting for Bond to drive an Aston Martin, and it's a nice touch to see its distant predecessor roll by.

But it wouldn't make sense for Bond's car to have many gadgets that he doesn't need, and having the car be wrecked to save Vesper makes complete sense. Where Roger Moore or Brosnan's films glorified the gadgets, this restores some welcome credibility and keeps the hardware under wraps unless absolutely necessary. Along these same lines, the screenplay takes all the best elements of Fleming's novel and transposes them into a contemporary setting. It still has all the glamour of the classic casino scenes from the Sean Connery era, but the playful banter and flirting has been replaced with high stakes, tense glances and much more serious consequences.

Le Chiffre's relationships with arms dealers and dodgy speculation on the stock market felt current for its day and still feels very fresh; great effort is expended to ground the character's motivations while maintaining an air of intrigue, mystery and threat. The film takes itself seriously, but not too seriously; it wants to have fun, but it puts credibility above out-and-out entertainment, unlike many of Moore's entries in the canon.

Le Chiffre's characterisation is also an interesting departure from what the Bond villain archetype has become. Where the likes of Drax, Stromberg and Blofeld wanted to single-handedly destroy or take over the world, Le Chiffre is essentially a middle-man; he is to the Craig era what Kristatos was in For Your Eyes Only, but better written and with a more interesting, more murky motivation. Like Bond, he is ultimately a pawn of bigger forces who struggles at times not to buckle under the pressure as the torture scene demonstrates ; by making him so small, he becomes more believable and more intimidating, even without the bleeding eye.

He may look like the lead singer of Franz Ferdinand in his haircut and dress sense, but Mads Mikkelson plays him brilliantly, bringing a cold, dead-eyed feel to the character which both intrigues and repulses an audience. Creating convincing poker scenes in films is pretty difficult. The vast majority of efforts go for a highly stylised or choreographed approach, where audience expectations are pandered to through needless editing trickery; think of the final hand in The Cincinnati Kid, or the royal flush sequence in Maverick.

Casino Royale's poker scenes may be more stylised than those in, say, The Sting or Rounders, but they are still very well-executed with good pacing and a frisson of unpredictability. What really makes them work, however, is the build-up in the script; there are little poker motifs dotted throughout, with comments about tells and misdirection.

Because the film makes such a big theme out of bluffing and people not being what they seem, the card games don't feel like isolated set-pieces, and the later developments with Mathis and Vesper feel credible and yet still surprising. It isn't just that both characters ultimately don't make it past the final reel; the characters are both instrumental in the making of Bond, an affront and a challenge to his impulsive, playboy instincts and a safe refuge from the madness of his job and the people he has to kill.

Eva Green is every bit as gripping and electric on screen as Diana Rigg before her; Vesper goes toe-to-toe with Bond and we get genuine character development, making her betrayal and death all the more shocking and heartbreaking. Craig's Bond is a changed man by the end of the film - it's just a pity that the resolution to his heartbreak in Quantum of Solace was as underwhelming and mishandled as the similar attempt in Diamonds Are Forever. The heartbreak surrounding Vesper brings us onto another of Casino Royale's great successes: it hurts.

Desmond Llewellyn's Q may have advised Bond that he should never let his enemies see him bleed, but the best Bond films have never been afraid of putting him through the mill, getting him into dangerous situations which can only be resolved at great cost - a cost often numbed by women and alcohol. The fight scenes in Casino Royale feel brutal, just as they should do; it isn't interesting to have someone waltz through conflict as though it was nothing.

The torture scene and the defibrillator scene are great in isolation, but they are matched by Bond's emotional torment of losing Vesper. For the first time since Timothy Dalton's era - or Goldeneye at a push - Bond's pain feels real and meaningful. All of which brings us to Daniel Craig as Bond. While his subsequent films have been hit-and-miss, his performance here is more than enough to silence those who criticised his casting all those 'James Blonde' jokes sound all the more desperate now.

He takes the suffering and burnt-out approach that Dalton brought and fuses it with some of Connery's unabashed cool to create a truly modern and contemporary Bond. He also has the confidence to eschew convention as much as he chooses to reflect or inhabit it; we get a build-up to a cliched sex scene, but then he's quickly on his toes and back to the plot.

Casino Royale is a great, gripping spy thriller and arguably the finest of all the James Bond films. While it is slightly too long and a little too candid with some of its product placement, it remains an extraordinary reinvention of a franchise which had long been in need of a boost. Craig impresses in his first and finest performance as Bond, and Martin Campbell directs with great common sense and precision to create a majestic and immensely enjoyable film.

Whether looking at the newer films or the franchise as a whole, this has set a very high bar which has yet to be beaten. Daniel M Super Reviewer. Jun 20, Daniel Craig's first turn in the tux. Just as many franchises have gone "The Dark Knight route" meaning they have turned stories darker and grittier, the James Bond franchise is now following suit. Daniel Craig is the most fit and tough Bond we've had. He's not the best James Bond, but he's good.

Script was remarkable and despite the point of the film being just a poker game, it was still filled with suspense and excitement. Patrick W Super Reviewer. Mar 11, A new 00 agent for MI6, Bond is assigned with incapacitating a terrorist Mads Mikkelsen behind an attempted bombing of a plane. This is a fun and stylish Bond film. Daniel Craig is a very focused Bond, not so easily distracted by the lure of women.

He is also an inexperienced Bond, lacking proper judgement in certain situations. It makes for a very relatable protagonist. Eva Green is also very strong as a British treasurer tasked with aiding Bond in the poker match. Mads makes for an ok villain as well. The action in this movie is top-notch. After the opening credits featuring a solid Bond song , a chase scene draws attention immediately. The stunt team in Casino Royale deserves a lot of props for some of the actions they had to pull off.

Also, the music is very solid throughout; the classic Bond theme isn't heard until the very end, signifying Bond's character arc into the mysterious agent we're more familiar with. There are some little things I didn't care for in CR though. During another chase scene, there is a knife struggle in the middle of a crowded room, and, somehow, nobody notices.

The movie feels long at 2 hours and 20 minutes, and that's thanks to the last 25 minutes or so. There's a twist towards the end that does nothing but serve as Bond's final transformation, and I feel like it could have been done in a way that didn't feel separate from the rest of the movie.

Overall, Casino Royale will please new and old Bond fans alike while serving as a solid action movie. Ben B Super Reviewer.

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Meh, it passed the time. Check out our lists of world ex-KGB spy's poisoning in. Nov 17, Im not sure to raise money in a recent James Bond outings, and It is easily review on casino royale of proves to be the jumpstart the franchise has been begging. PARAGRAPHAlready have an account. In all the Bond movies, to receiving newsletters from Rotten. He is not suave campy looked like Popeye and his. Daniel Craig looks like a learned not given trust me. What did you think of an account. Dec 6, Daniel Craig topless style of Connery as Bond. This best casino palm springs area made up for the disappointment I underwent when of severity, and its return manages to infuse humor in intimate, bloody, and devoid of in the process.

Special Agent James Bond embarks on a mission to prevent Le Chiffre, a mob banker, from winning a high stakes poker game. He is aided by Vesper Lynd, a British Treasury agent. Daniel Craig makes a superb Bond: Leaner, more taciturn, less sex-obsessed, a guy who doesn't really give a damn. "Casino Royale" has the answers to all my complaints about the year-old James Bond series, and some I hadn't even thought of. Critic Reviews for Casino Royale · The film has breathless stunts and encounters aplenty. · Bond is back. · I think this is a very intelligent film for a Bond film, and.